Tag Archives: Camille Martin

“A deserted city. We’ll have to imagine it’s in a movie.”

On the eve of December 21, my penultimate end-of-the-world poem, this one from Looms:

*
A deserted city. We’ll have to imagine
it’s in a movie. Beneath a listless dome, walls
crumble into backlit dust. Flames on a hillside swarm,
tattered auburn fishes in the autumn wind. Glints of dying
light fall on unmoored mountains whose thoughts of home
come to nothing. Everywhere, flocks of matter dip pale snouts
into inky ponds. We’ll have to imagine someone watching
that movie. No one left to forget irrelevant seeds. Some left off
praying to the mother of a tarnished idol presiding over a flock
of angels, breath attended by golden lice. Others
paused long enough to view dusk’s leisurely descent
over the white noise of crashing surf. All found something
to swear by before it was too late. Photogenic dullards jazzed
in the waning light. A ship’s captain jingled his coins
before staving in the ship. Embers in a hearth
illuminated fish bones on plates.

NIBIRU

Sonnets and Looms are available from the following vendors:

Small Press Distribution
Book City in Toronto
Apollinaire’s Bookshoppe
Amazon.ca
Shearsman Books.

Cheers!


Camille Martin

“Glib spice announces the news . . .”: More Pre-Mayan-Apocalypse Fiddling

from Sonnets

*
Glib spice announces the news bleeding
in the monochromatic distance. The short-term
memory of distance flees in fear. Enemies
fall, money flees. Falling gloom dazzles just
as history taught it to. Not the history of stars
made of tumbleweed nor the annals of a dust mote
singing rich disaster. Masoch was never so rich,
or so it seems to each geological layer. No
notebook records a pocket of posies between thick
layers of ash. It just is, caught in a small pocket
of time. “Time to return to star,” announces
tumbleweed on the news. The news shrinks
to a speck of pollen on a posy’s anther
in a pocket caught between thick layers of ash.

2012 - 2

Sonnets and Looms are available here:

Small Press Distribution
Book City in Toronto
Apollinaire’s Bookshoppe
Amazon.ca
Shearsman Books
The Book Depository

Cheers!


Camille Martin

Fiddling While Earth Burns: Poems for the End of Time

          I’m obsessed with The End, with the smorgasbord of choices for Armageddon that Neil deGrasse Tyson cheerfully ticks off: asteroid, caldera eruption, mega-tsunami, black hole. Not surprisingly, some of my poems have an apocalyptic theme.
          So in honour of the rapidly-approaching December 21, 2012—of the dreaded cataclysm that Mayan astronomers predicted (unless they just got tired of chiselling)—I’ll be posting poems to while away the countdown to the terrestrial torch. The first poem is below.
          And what would 2012 prophesies be without a little shameless commercialism? I’m selling poetry, not opulent underground condos, but then, to paraphrase William Carlos Williams, survivalists die miserably on doomsday for lack of what is found in poems.
          The clock is ticking, but you can still get a copy of Sonnets and Looms from the following vendors: Small Press Distribution, Book City in Toronto, Amazon.ca, and Shearsman Books.
          Help keep my kitchen, where I’m hunkering down with proper Canadian garrison mentality, stocked with beans and rice during these anti-climactic end times.

from Sonnets:

*
From a helicopter at night, an aerial
view of a city. In the dark, gigantic
iron statues loom with an ominous
aura of permanence. The people
who live in the city obsess
about the possibility of doomsday
erupting among their soaring
buildings and effigies. Of the end
they’ve made a fetish, chatting
about it at cocktail parties as if
it were the latest vogue. They believe
that it could happen at any moment,
so they no longer bother
to make their beds in the morning.

2012


Camille Martin

 

“Sleep and Forgetting”: a new collage

My most recent collage, “Sleep and Forgetting.” The title is from William Wordsworth’s “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood.”

The original is sold, but the work is available as an archival print mounted on stained wood panel.

“Sleep and Forgetting” is now uploaded to my website’s Gallery 5, “Afterimages of History.” Click the image to link to the gallery:


Camille Martin

New Rampike Magazine issue: Poetics, Part Two

Fabulous new issue of Rampike includes “Blueshift Road,” the title poem of my new manuscript, and kickass poems by Susan Holbrook, Amanda Earl, and many, many more. Hat-doff to editors Karl E. Jirgens, Marissa Reaume, and John Matias.

Click the image to link to Rampike:

RAMPIKE

Vol. 21/No.2 (Poetics: Part Two): Michael Winkler, Leonard Cohen & Judith Fitzgerald, Charles Bernstein, Susan Gold & Mike Dyer, George Bowering, Frank Davey, Katie Solbeck, Terry Trowbridge & Alexander Brown, Richard Kostelanetz, Peter Jaeger, Jesse Ferguson, Cathy Wagner, Tim Atkins, Amy De’Ath, Brenda Francis Pelkey, Richard Parker, Marcus Slease, Edward Nixon, Christian Burgaud, Susan Holbrook, Louis Cabri, Brian Ang, Harvey L. Hix, Kevin McPherson Eckoff, Stephen Remus, Eric Schmaltz, Travis Kirton, Kelly Mark, bill bissett, Judith Copithorne, Gregory Betts, Hallie Siegel, Matt Donovan, a.rawlings, derek beaulieu, Steve McCaffery, bill bissett, Cyril Dabydeen, Babar Khan, Norman Lock, George Elliott Clarke, tENTATIVELY a cONVENIENCE, Denise Desautels & Norman Cornett, Amanda Earl, Nick Power, Lindsey Bannister, Paul Lisson, Raquel Torres, Camille Martin, Stephanie McKenzie, Justin Langlois, Robert Anderson, Andre Narbonne, Tray Drumhann, Eric Zboya, Mat Laporte, Nico Vassilakis, Robert Dassanowsky, rob mclennan & Sachiko Murakami, derek beaulieu, & Ottarormstad, Britt-Marie Lindgren, Michael Basinski, FRONT COVER: Reed Altemus, BACK COVER:Andrew Topel.


Camille Martin

Photos: Plugged In at the Skylab

          The Skylab Gallery is an alternative artspace at a loft in downtown Columbus, Ohio. One room remains bare–great for art exhibitions and performance art. The other room with its six huge windows and cushy sofas has the feel of a bohemian coffee shop–poetry reading heaven.
          The evening I was there featured an electrifying performance by Adam Rose of Antibody Corporation, a Chicago dance troupe, as well poetry readings (also juiced) by John M. Bennett, Wendy Lee Spacek, and myself. Many thanks to poet James Payne for inviting me.

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Camille Martin

“Believe in biblical colors, Floodlings”: Cinquains with John M. Bennett and C. Mehrl Bennett

          Before the Skylab Gallery reading in Columbus, I went out with John and Cathy Bennett for a bite to eat. We had time to kill, so they suggested collaborating on cinquains.
          Cathy published them on her blog. Have a look-see.

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Camille Martin

Photos: Tyrone Williams, James LaCroix, and Camille Martin at Detroit’s Woodward Line Series

          A couple of weeks before the reading, James Hart, co-curator of Detroit’s Woodward Line Poetry Series, realized that two other poets and I were booked for Thanksgiving Eve. We assumed that only a handful of people would show up. But in fact the reading was very well attended.
          As a venue, The Scarab Club is a poetry series curator’s dream: a beautiful open space with great acoustics in an historic old building.
          I had the pleasure of reading with two terrific poets, both from Detroit: James LaCroix and Tyrone Williams.
          Many thanks to the organizers and hosts of the evening, including Kim Hunter and James Hart III.

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Camille Martin

Detroit, Thanksgiving Eve: Tyrone Williams, James La Croix, Camille Martin


Camille Martin

“Poetry, Art, Music—and the Gift of Synesthesia” (an image essay in Talking Writing)

A couple of years ago, Talking Writing published some poems of mine from Looms, a manuscript that has recently been published by Shearsman Books.

Martha Nichols, one of the editors, recently approached me about writing an illustrated essay about what it’s like to work in three disciplines: poetry, collage, and music.

I invite you to have a look at the resulting featured spread in Talking Writing and to explore the rest of the issue, which will be added to during the next few weeks.

Click the image below to view my collages and essay:


Camille Martin

Looms “expansive”: mclennan

Many thanks to rob mclennan for his lovely review of Looms!

“There is such an expansiveness to Martin’s Looms. The poems exist in that magical place where words, images and ideas collide, creating connections that previously had never been.”

In his review, rob generously included a couple of poems from the book. If you’d like to read more from Looms, you can order a copy at the following vendors (click to link):

                                                                     

Thumbs-up to 11 poetry books (and so many more)

          This year, Steve Evans of the University of Maine invited me to participate in the tenth anniversary of Attention Span, in which eighty poets list the eleven books that influenced them the most in 2012 (not necessarily published in 2012).
          Click the image below to go to the complete list of my choices. I was just getting warmed up when I had already used up my allotted eleven books. I could have listed so many more. Have a look at the lists of other poets while you’re at the site, and stay tuned to Attention Span for the annual tally of votes.


Camille Martin

Film Noir collage

I just added the collage below to the “Americana” gallery of my website:

The alternating strips are stills from two different films noirs. When I was researching the genre for this project, I found a lavishly illustrated book of film noir posters. Some were in monochromatic half-tones, which inspired me to tint the two stills as a way to allude to this type of poster as well as to contrast the alternating strips. I had tried several combinations of images, but the arrangement of these two seemed to allow a mysterious and compelling interaction between the characters and shadows.


Camille Martin

The Magic Leaf and Flying Tadpole of Cobourg

I was on Google Maps wandering around Cobourg, Ontario (where I’ll be reading on Tuesday), and came across THE COBOURG LEAF, which apparently magically appears as you drive towards the lake on Church Street. Someone also pointed out a FLYING TADPOLE to the upper left.

I’m convinced that anything can happen in Cobourg.


Camille Martin

On Cross-Pollination: An interview with Camille Martin by James Pickersgill

My “world premiere” of Looms will be in Cobourg, Ontario, about an hour’s train ride east of Toronto.

Poet James Pickersgill put together some thought-provoking interview questions in advance of the reading. Below is a sample, and the complete interview can be found here.

Q – Camille, it is not at all true that poetry is your single creative outlet. You are known as a collage artist, too. You are an editor yourself … and a translator. Your own work has been translated into other languages as well. You have been a university teacher. You’ve organized poetry reading series. You’ve had radio shows and you blog actively on the internet. When listed like that, these activities might sound like an array of separate pigeon-holes but I suspect that there is a lot of cross-pollination, so to speak. What is the nature of this creativity as you experience it: one spark that finds many openings to jump into flame, or, can it be distinct and separate creative impetuses?

Camille Martin – I love the idea of cross-pollination. In fact, I think my primary creative impulse is to bring together: to merge or to juxtapose. It’s the basic impetus for the metaphor: to bring unlike things into dialogue. And for me, that goes for disciplines as well. I was reading and seeking out poetry on my own from an early age, though I didn’t begin writing it in earnest until my late 30s. But my first creative expression was musical – I was trained as a classical pianist since I was six years old, and I went on to get a graduate degree in piano performance. I was also intensely interested in visual art. I’ve always felt a desire to bring the arts together. So now, in the autumn of my life, I have the pleasure of doing all three: making collages, writing poetry, and setting my poetry to music. I think these disciplines are sparking conversations among each another.


Camille Martin

LOOMS now at SPD

Always happy when my books arrive at Small Press Distribution!

Poetry. The title of LOOMS signifies the weaving tool as well as the shadowing appearance of something. These “woven tales” were inspired by Barbara Guest’s statement that a tale “doesn’t tell the truth about itself; it tells us what it dreams about.” The strands of their surreal allegories converse, one idea giving rise to another, and the paths of their dialogue become the fabric of the narrative. In a second meaning, something that looms remains in a state of imminent arrival. Such are these tales, like parables with infinitely deferred lessons.

“In tightly woven tapestry, Martin’s ‘backstreet songs’ re-invent a music of knowledge that navigates the hucksterism and catastrophe threatening our planet. The movement of her threads is fugue-like, punctuated by oboes and clarinets, mockingbirds and cicadas. Here, in the dream-space of time-lapse film, forms of life and ideas collide and morph, rippling through centuries of human consciousness to unravel as quickly as they ravel. Here, above all, Martin makes it possible to dance among our ‘origins in snake oil,’ our ‘crusades to mirages’ and our ‘accidental fictions’.”—Meredith Quartermain

“A dreamscape on the outskirts of town, ‘in the badlands of the vernacular,’ these hopeful, haunted poems populated by children and prisoners ‘hover between’ realms domestic and exterior, real and imagined. Like candles described herein, this book gives off a melting, tactile glow.”—Arielle Greenberg


Camille Martin

A box full of the mysterious woman playing blindman’s bluff among neurons

click image for Shearsman Books page for Looms

My box of Looms has arrived, and copies distributed to five Goodreads winners.

Shearsman Books has a pdf sample as well as a handy list of links where you can order the book.

Many thanks to Tony Frazer, publisher extraordinaire of Shearsman Books.

May the poems in Looms bring you pleasure!


Camille Martin

Group art exhibition at the Elgin Theatre


Camille Martin’s Rescue at the Elgin Theatre group exhibition

Also in the exhibition: works by Stacey Camp, David Marshak, Romas Astrauskas, Zora Buchanan, Ila Kellermann, Menno Krant, Myriam Levy, Andrew M. Smith, Jay McCarten, Frances Ferdinands and Adi Zur.

Good things are happening with my art as well as my poetry, and more in the wings very soon . . .


Camille Martin

C. L. Bledsoe’s mindful review of Sonnets

         There’s a terrific review of Sonnets (Shearsman Books, 2010) by C. L. Bledsoe at Murder Your Darlings. I say “terrific” not only because it’s a positive review (music to any poet’s ears) but also because the reviewer quotes from and discusses several poems in the book. It’s a mindful review, and it’s evident he didn’t just skim the book but read slowly and attentively.
         Bledsoe’s general appraisal of Sonnets:

“Martin’s poems are complex and elegant. She reveals a vital, passionate intellect in these poems that move fast as river water after a spring thaw. I can’t wait to read her next collection.”

Click the image below to read his thought-provoking review:

Sonnets can be ordered on the publisher’s page, which offers links to multiple distributors.


Camille Martin

Enter at Goodreads for free copy of Looms

As the official publication date of Looms nears, I registered the book for the Goodreads giveaway. It’s free to enter, and at the end date I’ll mail copies to the winners (selected by Goodreads using some algorithm that’s beyond my poetry-addled brain to fathom) . . .

Click the image below to enter at Goodreads:


Cheers!


Camille Martin