Paris Wanderlust: Brick Play

Brick Play

One of the most appealing architectural features in Paris is the creative use of polychrome brickwork on facades. The colourful patterns can be complex and eye-catching.

14 Rue du Parc de Montsouris (1920) (14e)

The geometric patterns of the brickwork provide an ideal medium for Art Deco style, as in this 1914 apartment building in the paquebot style:

Architect: Ernest Billecocq, 66 Rue Falguière (1914) (15e)

Such brickwork is nothing new. It appears in various places in Europe during Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance times. Modern polychrome brickwork made a strong comeback in the second half of the 19th century.

The building below recalls 17th-century Place des Vosges, with its masonry of red brick and contrasting white stone quoins.

Architect: Gabriel Ruprich-Robert (1859-1953), L’Institut Catholique de Paris & Musée Edouard Branly, 21 Rue d’Assas (1894-1897) (6e)

However, the fancy brickwork beneath the windows places the building closer to late 19th century.

Floral City, a quiet island of homes of two to three storeys, has made an art of using brick patterns to create visual interest along the facades.

17 Rue des Volubilis, Cité Florale (1914) (13e)
23 Rue des Orchidées, Cité Florale (1900) (13e)

Brick play from the 21st century:

97 Rue Vaugirard (2001) (6e)

Next: Islands of Urban Tranquility — Cottages & Row Houses

Camille Martin

One response to “Paris Wanderlust: Brick Play

  1. Pingback: Paris Wanderlust: Art Deco | Rogue Embryo

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s