Of jonquils and grommets: Artichokes in Cricket

          Sublime summer, everyone! (Or wondrous wintertide for those below the Tropic of Capricorn.)
          Some posts got pre-empted by my series on Robert Zend, after which I took a hiatus from the blog for a couple of months. So I’m cranking it up again like an old Victrola.
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          Five minimalist poems from R Is the Artichoke of Rose are in the latest issue of Cricket Online Review. Mwah! to the editors.
          Click on the image below for the first poem, then “advance” for the rest:

COR IMAGE


Camille Martin

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Premiere issue of Touch the Donkey

          Three poems of mine (“Page Dust for Will”) are in the premiere issue (print!) of Touch the Donkey, published by rob mclennan in Ottawa. I’m in good company with Eric Baus, Hailey Higdon, rob mclennan, Norma Cole, Elizabeth Robinson, Rachel Moritz, Gil McElroy and Pattie McCarthy.
          Click the image below to get to the magazine’s website and . . . well, you know:

TOUCH THE DONKEY


Camille Martin

“My Most Beautiful Poems”: a tribute to Robert Zend at Cobourg’s TEXTual ARTivity

          The April 1 opening of TEXTual ARTivity, a visual poetry exhibition at The Human Bean coffee shop in Cobourg, Ontario, featured readings by poets in attendance. Wally Keeler, one of the organizers, was good enough to videotape and upload the readings to YouTube.
          Below is my reading, in which I present Robert Zend’s exhibited typescape, “Peapoteacock” and read “My Most Beautiful Poems,” from Zend’s book From Zero to One:

PS TEXTual ARTivity will continue as an annual event in Cobourg, and that’s great news!


Camille Martin

Shadowing Duchamp’s Readymades (photos)

Shadows from the Duchamp room at the Ottawa Art Gallery:

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Camille Martin

Of Lazyboys and bagatelles: Sugar Beach – my new chap from Above/Ground Press

FRAGONARD JPG          Sugar Beach is my second chap from rob mclennan’s Above/Ground Press (the first was 2011’s If Leaf, Then Arpeggio). This one’s a two-fer — it contains minimalist poems from my manuscript R Is the Artichoke of Rose as well as material from the cosmic peregrinations of Blueshift Road, a work in progress.
          The title poem, “Sugar Beach,” gets its name from a white sand beach on Lake Ontario a couple of blocks from my home, with a view of the Redpath sugar plant; the cover’s Fragonard painting, “The Swing,” is a link in the poem’s chain of thoughts, along with a Smith & Wesson, a trapeze artist, and a black pigeon.
          Click on the images or here to order a copy from Above/Ground Press. Reviews of the chap are welcome.
          Below is a sample poem from the collection, “Endless Regression of Heavens,” first published by Similar Peaks magazine:

QUOTATION MARKS 7

Endless Regression of Heavens

Glaciers dribble foreign rocks
as dawn releases chicory blue.
Its fickle hues waltz round equator,
spool, top, dizzy moon, gainly

as the patter of millipedes ruffling
toward a country with no flag
but fields of chicory blue. Horizon,
chromatic with moments. What

of the next and the next, plunging
into myth evolving in the deeps?
Haunting the deeps while manning
the crow’s nest? With each finite

duration we arrive closer by half
to a famished constellation,
blinking beast perpetually devouring
a platter of chicory blue.

SUGAR BEACH 4


Camille Martin

Sky on sky – photos from the train

Window views reflecting scenes from the opposite windows, between Ottawa and Toronto, returning from a reading for the Tree Series:

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Camille Martin

Photos & report: Quill Puddle Release Party (at Detroit’s historic Scarab Club)

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* Unfortunately, not all of my photographs came out – my apologies to readers not represented in the slide show above.

          Detroit’s vibrant, grass-roots poetry community continues to bring the best of poetry from Detroit and beyond through series like the Woodward Line, held at the historic Scarab Club and organized by Kim Hunter, James Hart III, and Frances Barber. The lower floor houses an art gallery, so that poets and audience are surrounded by a compelling visual feast, which heightens the effect of the poetry.
QUILL PUDDLE 5 AND 6          Detroit is also home to Quill Puddle, a hand-made poetry magazine edited by James Hart III and Frances Barber. The evening of April 18 marked the launch of two double-issues of Quill Puddle (3-4 and 5-6), featuring poets Will Alexander, Kim Hunter, Rob Lipton, Ken Mikolowski, Christine Monhollen, Julie Patton, Chris Tysh, Dennis Teichman, Matvei Yankelevich, Barbara Henning, and myself.

          Following a mesmerizing set by The Doll Hairs (James Hart III, guitar and vocals, and Frances Barber, vocals), Julie Patton gave an extended and stunning performance, accompanied by Will Alexander (keyboard), James Hart II (percussion), and Paul Van Curen (guitar). It was magical. I hope the recording came out well, because it would be a shame not to be able to revisit that dynamic performance.
          The next day, I had the pleasure of visiting the Eastern Market, a large market area composed of many buildings, one of which is Salt & Cedar, a letterpress studio. New York poet and co-publisher of Ugly Duckling Presse Matvei Yankelevich arranged to convert the letterpress printing space into a bookstore and poetry reading venue for three months. It was a delight to meet and get to know Matvei, who is devoting his time in Detroit to enriching the already rich poetry scene there.
          Thanks to Matvei, Salt & Cedar is (for the time being, at least) bookstore heaven, stocked by titles from Ugly Duckling Presse, Small Press Distribution, and others, including several Canadian titles – I noticed books by Sina Queyras and Nicole Brossard, among others. I purchased books by Clark Coolidge (88 Sonnets), Tomaz Salamun (On the Tracks of Wild Game – part of Matvei’s Eastern European Series within UDP), Swedish poet Fredrik Nyberg (A Different Practice), Matvei Yankelevich (Alpha Donuts), and Russian Absurdist Alexander Vvedensky (An Invitation for Me to Think). The last title was suggested to me by Matvei when I told him of my affinity for the work of Daniil Kharms, another Russian absurdist who, along with Vvedensky, tragically died in their thirties as a result of Stalin’s harsh persecution of writers.
          People, Detroit is a happening mecca for poets and an open community for poetry in all its manifestations, written and performed!


Camille Martin